Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Age UK’

I am in my third year of organising the local Memory Walk with Jo Wilde for the Alzheimer’s Society. Previously Jo and I have organised this by ourselves but we had such a lot of interest last year so we designed a committee to help us and this year it is going swimmingly.

Being with the committee group has been great to generate and discuss new ideas and this year our event will be better than ever. Not only do we have two walks but we also have various stalls inc: raffle, cake stalls, guess the name of the monkey (I think it should be called Dave), guess how many sweets in the jar, face painting and some craft stalls.

Monkey

It takes a lot of advertising to get an event off the ground and I had great fun talking on the radio promoting our event.

Me talking on air at Blyth Valley Radio 2015

I would like to pay a special thanks to TMS Media for writing our press releases,  and the Lowestoft Journal and the Beach Radio for their support. Would also like to thank local businesses that have donated fab raffle prizes and their names will be in the post walk article in the newspaper.

Thanks to the fab committee for all their hard work: Jo Wilde, Linda Harmer, Liana Moyse, Estelle Tasker, Carla Neve, Phil Mummery, Lucy Rayner, Helen Thwaites and Enid Thwaites.

Memory Walk poster

Journal piece~Friday before event

If you would like to know more about our event please click on this link:

https://www.facebook.com/Lowestoft-Memory-Walk-27th-Sept-2015-1468057330150195/timeline/

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

75-year-old Maureen Lansdale has had her memory fully restored after becoming the first person in the UK to undergo a new treatment for the brain.

Two years ago the grandmother-of-nine began losing her memory including the names of her children and her own address. The doctors diagnosed her as having a vascular malformation, when a vein and artery have incorrectly joined together in the brain.

But thanks to the pioneering treatment, where the vascular malformation is removed through the nose, Mrs Lansdale’s health and memory have been restored.

‘It sounded scary being the first but I couldn’t live the way I was living, so I agreed. I’ve had the most wonderful thing done for me and I’m so grateful.

‘I hope many others can benefit too.’

A second patient has already undergone the same treatment successfully and doctors are hoping to roll it out across the UK this year

https://www.facebook.com/ageuk

 

 

Read Full Post »

Dementia

‘UK’s dementia care betrayal: Nine in ten care homes and hospitals fail patients, says damning report

  • CQC review finds widespread neglect, lack of care and poor training
  • They found that 90% had some aspect of poor or inconsistent care.’                                                                                                                                    Daily Mail 13th Oct 2014

Reading this is worrying but not a surprise. We’re hearing more now about poor care. It can be very stressful if you need to find a care/nursing home for your loved one with dementia, a care/nursing home that provides care and support with a dedicated staff team.

But as we read above, there is ‘a staggering 90 per cent of the care homes and hospitals inspected found to have aspects of variable or poor care’. So where does this leave us for who are trying to find a good care home for our loved one. And why is this happening?

I have seen great staff across the country who genuinely care for those they support. They are dedicated and provide person centred support, and many a time work long hours due to staff shortages/sickness. I have also seen staff that have delivered poor care. Sometimes, it’s not their fault. The staff/client ratios in these large homes are minimal and it would be helpful for the Care Quality Commission to bring in a minimum number of clients to staff ratio. The former Commission of Social Care Inspection [CSCI] had this.

Dementia is a specilised area and need staff who are trained to support people with dementia. It is not good enough to receive training on how to support older people, training is needed on how to support individuals with dementia. People can live well with dementia, but only if staff have the knowledge on how to support the individual to do this.

Is a care/nursing home needed for the individual with dementia or can they be supported at home, with a Personal Budget? [Personal budgets give you flexibility in how your care needs are met.]

What is needed in a care/nursing home to enable a person with dementia to be cared for, and be safe? As a minimum this is needed:

The care assessment completed prior to going into the care/nursing home needs to give an accurate full description of the individual’s needs.

We need to get the right quality of care. Staff to be recruited who genuinely want to care and support others [not those who see it as ‘just a job’].

High turnover rates lead to lack of continuity. Do the managers carry out an Exit Interview with staff to see why they’re leaving? If they did, this may help them see the reasons and if the reasons are to do with the Home then the manager can look to rectify this.

Money available to train staff in this specialised area and this money to be used for training and nothing else.

Time for staff to complete training.

Staff to discuss with their supervisor/manager afterwards to see if the training met their need.

Good client staff ratio on shifts.

Time for staff to carry out best practice [and not cut corners due to short staffing].

Senior on shift to lead the shift, monitor, observe and discuss poor practice if apparent.

Staff to receive regular 1-1 confidential supervision sessions where training needs are identified, performance discussed, feedback given and concerns shared.

Staff to be able to express their concerns without fear of reprisal or losing their job.

What makes a good care/nursing home?

Many care/nursing homes can look grand from the outside, and sometimes on the inside too. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that they pay the same amount of time cleaning the place to supporting the people who live there.

Some of the things I feel should be in place:

Care/support plans are individual to the person [and not the same as everyone elses]. The plans should take in the uniqueness of the individual, their interests, abilities, needs and preferences.

Staff must treat individuals with dignity and respect.

Systems should be in place to help the individual with choices. This can be objects to refer to or pictures/photographs.

Dedicated and trained staff team.

Keyworker system in place.

Good leadership and support for staff.

Clients and family are listened to.

House meetings where the people living there are able to express opinions and make suggestions for their home.

Happy, relaxed atmosphere.

Activities for the individual to choose if s/he wishes to participate.

Useful websites:

Alzheimer’s Society http://alzheimers.org.uk/

Age UK http://www.ageuk.org.uk/

Health Watch http://www.healthwatch.co.uk/

The Silver Line http://www.thesilverline.org.uk/

Read Full Post »