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Archive for the ‘Care and Support’ Category

As you will recall, I was invited by Dallas Dixon, in America, to write a piece for his blog, on Elder Abuse. I would like to share this comment someone left on it-
‘Prevention begins with awareness. Books and articles like Suzan’s really do make a difference. How amazing that in the midst of her own pain of losing her mother, Suzan is reaching out to help others through spreading awareness about elderly abuse. I enjoyed reading this blog, and appreciate Dallas Dixon for making this information available.’  http://goo.gl/QavPgo

 

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I was invited by Dallas, over in the USA, to write a piece on Elder Abuse http://goo.gl/QavPgo

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On Blyth Valley Radio talking about elder abuse and sharing the concerns you have on the care you/or a relative/friend is receiving.

At Blyth Valley Radio Station~3~21st May 2014

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Tomorrow, Sunday, I am being featured as ‘Author of the week’ on the radio with the fab Tracey Edges  on Sirenfm. Hope you can listen in, 9-11am. And  ‪#‎Koolandthegang and ‪#‎Elviscostello will be on there too!

Me! On the same show as Kool and the Gang and… Elvis Costello…?!

If only Mum and Aunty Ann were here, they would be so proud!

pic.twitter.com/8Qg5XXM9AP

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A complete stranger, a reader, got in touch with me via my website.

‘Hello Suzan, You don’t know me, but I have read your book – ‘Beyond My Control: Why the Health and Social Care System Need Not Have Failed My Mother’ and wanted to tell you how much it has helped me.

My mother was in a care home and there were so many things that caused me anxiety and anguish about her care, I really didn’t know who to turn to at first, however, after reading the advice in your book I was able to get things moving.

There were so many issues we had to address that I was always expressing concern when things were not right for any of the residents, let alone my mother.  Eventually, they realised that I was not going to let them get away with bad care.  Again, we followed the advice in your book-we didn’t always visit at the same time or on the same day. And we saw different things happening, not all good!

I told the homes managers of my concerns. She was useless, so I did what you say in your book, I put my concerns in writing and I kept a copy. I thanked staff when they did well and told them when I knew [after reading your book] that things were not right, i.e. expecting mother to sleep on a wet, urine stained mattress [which smelt awful!] and be put to bed after tea time [although she didn’t always eat her tea, which meant she had to go right through until 7am the next morning to have something to eat]. She was put to bed at 6.30pm and lights out].

Similar to the good nurse in your book, this home had one excellent carer. She gave excellent care, empathy and understanding. She was with us at the end of mothers life having just completed a 14 hour shift, but didn’t go home as she could see that mother was nearing the end.

Thank you for sharing your story; it helped us at a time when we really needed it. The book helped my mother have a dignified death. Thank you. I am so sorry your mother did not have a dignified death. She would be proud if she knew what you were doing to help others. I will be thinking of my mother and your dear mother tomorrow, on Mother’s Day. I am shedding tears as I write. God Bless xx’

[Names omitted to protect identity].

My mum left me with a mission. A mission to ensure that no one will ever, ever suffer the way she did. A mission to get the message out there on what is good care and bad care and to raise awareness on how to report concerns if you or your loved one is receiving poor care, in a care home, nursing home, hospital or receiving care at home. ‘Beyond My Control: Why the Health and Social Care System Need Not Have FailedMy Mother’ is available in Kindle and Paperback and can be bought from various websites including:BMC jpeg

Amazon http://goo.gl/8wq4wo

My publisher’s website, Hammersmith Books ow.ly/uFIxW

4/5* reviews on Amazon ☆’Beyond My Control: Why the Health and Social Care System Need Not Have Failed My Mother’ ☆http://goo.gl/dYiXJl

But you know it’s not about how many copies is sold. It is about getting the message out there, so why not ask your library to get copies in

Beyond My Control: Why the Health and Social Care System Need Not Have Failed My Mother

ISBN no: 978-1781610282

 

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Every hospital in England will have a legal duty to own up to mistakes and errors that cause harm to patients under a new “duty of candour” to be introduced by the Government.

Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, will announce today that in future all healthcare providers must notify patients about incidents where severe or moderate harm has occurred, and provide an apology.

At the same time Mr Hunt will lay out new plans to reduce avoidable medical errors in the NHS by half over the next three years – potentially saving up to 6,000 lives a year.

Under a new initiative hospitals will be asked to draw up plans to reduce medication errors, blood clots, bed sores and other preventable incidents.

Hospitals which satisfactory implement their strategies will be able to reduce the premiums they contribute to the NHS Litigation Authority, which each year pays out £1.3bn on litigation claims. However neither initiative will apply in Scotland and Wales unless the devolved Governments follow suit.

Both aspects of the plan are significant victories for campaigners who have long lobbied politicians and the medical profession for a more robust approach to dealing with cases of clinical errors.

Peter Walsh, the chief executive of Action against Medical Accidents, said it represented “potentially the biggest advance in patients’ rights and safety since the creation of the NHS”.

“For decades the NHS has frowned upon cover-ups but has been prepared to tolerate them,” he said.

“A lack of honesty when things go wrong adds insult to injury and causes unnecessary pain and suffering for everyone. Organisations that hide the truth are also less likely to learn from it.”

Mr Hunt will announce both changes at the Virginia Mason hospital in Seattle which, following the death of a woman who was accidentally injected with cleaning fluid 10 years ago, has turned itself around to become one of the safest hospitals in the world.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/jeremy-hunt-says-hospitals-will-be-obliged-to-report-medical-errors-9215360.html

 

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Report reveals undernutrition a major problem among people with dementia in all world regions

‘Nutrition and Dementia: a review of available research’ calls for stakeholders around the world to recognize nutrition as an important factor for the wellbeing of people with dementia, finding that 20-45% of those with dementia experience clinically significant weight loss over one year.

Commissioned by Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) and Compass Group, the report reviews dietary factors across the life course that might increase or decrease the risk of onset of dementia in later life. It also details what actions could be taken to improve the nutrition of people with dementia both through diet and external factors, such as modifying the mealtime environment and supporting and training carers.

The report recommends that nutritional standards need to be adopted throughout the health and social care sector, and that more research needs to be conducted into the effective components of diets that might prevent dementia and the progression of mild cognitive impairment.

It also highlights that evidence-based advice should be provided to inform consumer choices regarding the balance of risks and benefits associated with the use of nutritional supplements claimed to protect cognition in late life, before or after the onset of dementia.

The report also suggests that the problem of undernutrition has been grossly neglected so far both in research and practice. Professor Prince, from King’s College London, comments, “While weight loss in dementia is very common and can be an intrinsic part of the disease, it is avoidable and we should be doing much more to tackle the problem.”

Read the report

http://www.alz.co.uk/news/report-reveals-undernutrition-major-problem-among-people-with-dementia-in-all-world-regions

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